LMS prizes - details and regulations

The Society’s Council regularly awards one medal and nine prizes.  Each has a full set of regulations, summaries are below.

No person is eligible to receive a given Society prize more than once.

The DE MORGAN MEDAL is awarded in memory of Professor Augustus De Morgan, the Society's first President.  It is the Society's premier award and is awarded every third year (in years numbered by a multiple of three). The De Morgan Medal for year X can only be awarded to a mathematician who is normally resident in the United Kingdom on 1 January of year X. The only grounds for the award of the Medal are the candidate's contributions to mathematics.

The PÓLYA PRIZE is awarded in memory of Professor G. Pólya, who was a Member (and later Honorary Member) of the Society for about 60 years. It is awarded in those years, not numbered by a multiple of three, in which the De Morgan Medal is not available for award. The Pólya Prize is awarded in recognition of outstanding creativity in, imaginative exposition of, or distinguished contribution to, mathematics within the United Kingdom. It may not be awarded to any person who has previously received the De Morgan Medal.

The FRÖHLICH PRIZE is awarded in memory of Professor Albrecht Fröhlich (De Morgan Medallist 1992). The Fröhlich Fund for this purpose was based on a generous donation from Mrs Fröhlich, reflecting Professor Fröhlich's great enthusiasm for, and gratitude to, the London Mathematical Society.

It is awarded in even numbered years. The Fröhlich Prize for year X can only be awarded to a mathematician, who is either (i) normally resident in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland on 1 January of year X, or (ii) a member of the Society mainly educated in the United Kingdom. The Prize shall only be awarded to a mathematician who has fewer than 25 years (full time equivalent) of involvement in mathematics at post-doctoral level, allowing for breaks in continuity, or who in the opinion of the Prizes Committee is at an equivalent stage in their career. The Prize is awarded for original and extremely innovative work in any branch of mathematics.  The Fröhlich Prize may not be awarded to any person who has received the De Morgan Medal or the Pólya Prize.

The SHEPHARD PRIZE is awarded to a mathematician or mathematicians for making a contribution to mathematics with a strong intuitive component which can be explained to those with little or no knowledge of university mathematics, though the work itself may involve more advanced ideas.  The prize will be awared in odd-numbered years starting in 2015 and is the result of a very generous donation made to the Society by Professor Geoffrey Shephard.  The Shephard Prize may not be awarded to any person who has received the De Morgan Medal or the Pólya Prize.

The SENIOR ANNE BENNETT PRIZE is awarded, in memory of Anne Bennett who died suddenly whilst working for the Society. The prize is awarded triennially to a mathematician for year X who is normally resident in the United Kingdom on 1 January of year X. The grounds for the award are work in, influence on or service to mathematics, particularly in relation to advancing the careers of women in mathematics.  The Senior Anne Bennett Prize may not be awarded to anyone who has won the De Morgan Medal, the Polya Prize, the Naylor Prize or the Senior Whitehead Prize.

The SENIOR BERWICK PRIZE is named after Professor W. E. H. Berwick, a former Vice-President of the Society, and is awarded in even-numbered years. The Senior Berwick Prize for year X is awarded to the author(s) of an outstanding piece of mathematical research actually published by the Society during the eight years ending on 31 December of year X-1.

The SENIOR WHITEHEAD PRIZE is awarded, in memory of Professor J. H. C. Whitehead, a former President of the Society. It is awarded in odd-numbered years.  The Senior Whitehead Prize for year X can only be awarded to a mathematician who is normally resident in the United Kingdom on 1 January of year X. The grounds for the award may include work in, influence on or service to mathematics, or recognition of lecturing gifts in the field of mathematics; the Senior Whitehead prize may not be awarded to any person who has previously received the De Morgan Medal, Pólya Prize, Senior Anne Bennett or the Naylor Prize.

The NAYLOR PRIZE AND LECTURESHIP IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS is awarded in memory of Dr V.D. Naylor. It is awarded in odd-numbered years, The Naylor Prize for year X can only be awarded to a mathematician who is normally resident in the United Kingdom on 1 January of year X. The grounds for the award may include work in, and influence on, and contributions to applied mathematics and/or the applications of mathematics, and lecturing gifts. The Naylor Prize may not be awarded to any person who has previously received the De Morgan Medal, the Pólya Prize, the Senior Anne Bennett Prize or the Senior Whitehead Prize. The winner of the Naylor Prize for year X is normally invited to give the Naylor Lecture at a Society meeting in the year X+1.

The BERWICK PRIZE, also named after Professor W.E.H. Berwick, is awarded in odd-numbered years. The Berwick Prize for year X is awarded to the author(s) a definite piece of research actually published by the Society during the eight years ending on 31 December of year X-1.  The author(s) must not already be a Fellow of the Royal Society and must have fewer than 15 years (full time equivalent) of involvement in mathematics at post-doctoral level, allowing for breaks in continuity, or who in the opinion of the Prizes Committee is at an equivalent stage in their career.  The prize may not be awarded to any person who has previously received the the Senior Berwick Prize.

The WHITEHEAD PRIZES are also in memory of Professor J.H.C. Whitehead and are awarded each year. Whitehead Prizes for year X can only be awarded to mathematicians who, on 1 January of year X, are normally resident in the United Kingdom or members of the Society mainly educated in the United Kingdom, who are not already Fellows of the Royal Society, and have fewer than 15 years (full time equivalent) of involvement in mathematics at post-doctoral level, allowing for breaks in continuity, or who in the opinion of the Prizes Committee are at an equivalent stage in their career. Grounds for the award of a Whitehead Prize may include work in and influence on mathematics. Such a prize may not be awarded to any person who has previously received any other LMS Prize, with the exception of the Berwick and Senior Berwick Prizes.  Recipients of these prizes may be eligible for the Whitehead prize, provided they satisfy all other eligibility criteria.  Upto six Whitehead Prizes may be awarded each year. The regulations now allow for a Whitehead Prize to be awarded to joint winners.

The ANNE BENNETT PRIZE is also in memory of Anne Bennett and is awarded two years out of every three. The grounds for the award are work in and influence on mathematics, particularly acting as an inspiration for women mathematicians. The prize shall only be awarded to mathematicians who on the 1st January of the year of its award have fewer than 10 years (full time equivalent) of involvement in mathematics at post-doctoral level, allowing for breaks in continuity, or who in the opinion of the Prizes Committee are at an equivalent stage in their career.  The prize may not be awarded to anyone that has previously won any other LMS prize, with the exception of the Berwick Prize.

In addition to the above, in 2015 Council awarded two further additional prizes on a one-off basis as a part of the celebrations to mark the LMS 150th Anniversary:

The HIRST PRIZE AND LECTURESHIP FOR THE HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS – For contributions to the study of the history of mathematics. The prize will be awarded in recognition of original and innovative work in the history of mathematics, which may be in any medium.  Council has agreed that the Hirst Prize and Lectureship will continue into the future, being awarded in even-numbered years starting from 2018.

The PRIZE FOR COMMUNICATION OF MATHEMATICS - grounds for the award of the prize are communication of mathematics and excellence in communication. The communication of ideas may be in any medium and the audiences involved may be of any age-group.